News + Features
With the dawn of the next generation of consoles, games, and PC hardware on our doorstep, there has never been a better time to upgrade our PCs in order to future proof performance. However, with the rising cost of PC hardware and the significantly higher requirements for next-gen games (partly because of ray tracing), how long do you reasonably expect a new GPU to meet your gaming needs?
We are just under 2 weeks away until AMD’s next generation of Ryzen processors officially launch, the Ryzen 5000 series looks to be AMD’s best lineup yet for their gaming CPUs, but AMD has now infamously jacked up the prices because of their dominance in the market. Zen 3 is certainly shaping up to be a great generation of processors, but which one of the new lineup looks like the best buy?
Ubisoft currently has 2 massive games from some of their biggest franchises coming out just 2 weeks apart from each other, both Watch Dogs: Legion and Assassins Creed Valhalla. So naturally up to their launch we saw the official system requirements release, and oh boy were they something to behold.
AMD recently announced their next-gen Ryzen 5000 series processors based on the new Zen 3 architecture and launching November 5th, and whilst they offered some pretty enticing performance numbers, many were quick to point out the lack of non-X versions of the CPUs, as the prices for the Ryzen 5000 series were a bit higher than expected.
It’s nearly the end of the year, Christmas is on the horizon and the new next-gen consoles are right around the corner, 2020 has proven to be a pretty awful year for humanity, but now is arguably the best time ever to consider upgrading your PC to new hardware. So what PC component do you want to upgrade next?
AMD recently excited pretty much everyone away with their recent announcement of the Ryzen 5000 next-gen CPUs based on the new Zen 3 architecture. Whilst the entire presentation was mostly about the new chips, AMD also gave us a little tease of their upcoming Radeon RX 6000 GPUs as well.
Video games have come a long way since the early days of pong, and not just in terms of graphics, but also how they are actually developed. One of the biggest new innovations in digital distribution is Early Access, and since it's been a while since the first time it happened, we wanted to get a general idea of how everyone feels about Early Access titles now? Has the distribution strategy improved since it began? What else can be done to make it better?
The world of streaming has taken the film and TV industry by storm, and has subsequently enticed many of the big name companies in the video games industry to follow suit. We all know Netflix’s model for streaming: get as much content out there as possible, frequently and consistently. And now it looks like Microsoft is following the same idea.
Nvidia recently announced their next generation of RTX 30 series graphics cards, and with that we got the official reveal of the flagship RTX 3080, the RTX 3070, and the world’s first consumer 8K GPU the RTX 3090. Whilst all the cards have been enticing to many PC users, promising some major performance improvements and one of the biggest generational leaps in performance, there’s one thing that has proved a bit controversial: the amount of VRAM in the specified GPUs.
Cyberpunk 2077 feels like it has been an eternity coming. This is due in part to it first being announced back in May 2012. But our core excitement stems from the knowledge that the highly rated Cyberpunk 2077.
CD Projekt Red are once again gracing us with another huge AAA RPG, this time set in a dystopian tech-noir universe. Cyberpunk 2077 is one of if not the most anticipated game of the year, and its only 2 months away from launch now. So before we get another juicy Night City Wire episode, we wanted to ask you: what is it about Cyberpunk 2077 that gets you excited?