The first batch of consumer DDR5 memory modules have now entered mass production and are awaiting to launch later this year. The new generation of RAM is sure to be exciting for some as the next-gen PC platforms aim to support the new memory type with enhanced speeds and performance, and some of the specs have already been revealed.

Micron’s new DDR5 chips have now been delivered to several brands who are currently in the stage of validating the memory modules along with board partners like ASUS, MSI, ASRock, Gigabyte and more. This means they will soon be moving into trial mass production before launching later this year.

If you’ve been following the anticipation of DDR5 memory, you’ll know the exciting part is learning about what kind of speeds we can expect and at what sizes, and DDR5 certainly doesn’t disappoint at all. Here’s the full specifications roadmap released by memory brand Asgard:

Size Speed Voltage Timings Release Production
16GB 4800MHz 1.1V CL=40 2021 Mass production
32GB 4800MHz
5600MHz CL=46 2021-2022 Under development
64GB 5600MHz
6400MHz CL=52 2022-2023 To be determined
128GB 5600MHz CL=46 2021-2022 Under development
6400MHz CL=52 2022-2023 To be determined

So by the end of this year we should be seeing both 16GB and 32GB DDR5 memory available for desktops and feature 4800MHz speeds and CL40 timings. That’s pretty good, but these are so far the lowest standard speeds.

Moving onto the 2021-2022 timeframe, we’ll see 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB DDR5 kits at 5600MHz and CL46 timings. Apparently the 128GB kits are looking at around a mid-2020 launch, but some 128GB kits could come out sooner than that but at higher price points.

Finally, during 2022-2023 we should see some more extreme speeds with 64GB and 128GB kits featuring ridiculous 6400MHz speeds with CL52 timings. 6400MHz is also the maximum standard limit for DDR5 memory, and these will be the mainstream models in 2022-2023.

What is incredible about this is that these will be the standard speeds, so you can expect overclocked memory kits to be even faster (some manufacturers are even reporting speeds of 10,000MHz for kits that are currently in the Research phase!).

Early performance benchmarks indicate DDR5 should offer over twice the performance of DDR4. However, if you want to use these new memory kits you will need to wait for the launch of Intel’s Alder Lake processors later this year as well, which will be the first to support DDR5 memory.

What do you think? Are you excited for DDR5? Will you be upgrading your hardware for DDR5? What kind of memory do you have installed right now? Let us know!

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